History

The History Department at St Anthony’s consists of nine enthusiastic and knowledgeable teachers who are all keen to share their expertise. As a department we pride ourselves on the range of topics we cover, with students learning about the past from Prehistoric man right through to the present day. We are a popular option block, with many girls choosing to continue History through Key Stage 4 and also Key Stage 5; many of our past students have gone on to study the subject at university. All of our teachers are passionate about what they do, and present History pupils will attest that lessons are challenging, interactive and overall a lot of fun. We like to bring History alive through drama activities, and use lots of primary evidence to help us to understand and make sense of the past. There is something for everyone in History lessons, whether it be the subjects we teach or the way in which they are taught, we are certain that all pupils have an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

KS3 History is made up of learning about lots of different aspects of the past. We by looking at the daily lives of ordinary people in the past. Many students come to us with an interest in History but little real knowledge of how people lived. We look at how towns grew, how health was affected, what people did for entertainment and at issues such as the development of crime and punishment. In years 8 and 9 we cover amongst other things, the theme of Power and Protest, studying important people and events such as William I and the Battle of Hastings, Slavery, Adolf Hitler and much more. We like to include a lot of local History in our lessons. Did you know that one of the reasons for the rivalry between Sunderland AFC and Newcastle United was the English Civil War of the 17th Century? Or that the first person to die of the disease Cholera before it spread around the country came from Sunderland?

KS4 History focuses on two main studies. The first is the development of medicine through time, beginning with Prehistoric man and ending with medical challenges facing the world today. In between we focus on the development in understanding and treating disease, how surgery has improved, and why public health has got better. We investigate reasons for the progress and changes and study key individuals driving medical change. The second study is more in depth and focuses on Germany throughout the years 1919 to 1945. This covers the signing of the Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War I, Weimar Germany, the Rise of the Nazi Party, the consolidation of Hitler’s power and then life in Nazi Germany. Pupils find this topic very interesting and it never fails to engross students who are keen to ask questions and find out more.

We also are lucky enough to fit in controlled assessment on the fantastic local Roman fort of Segedunum. Pupils have the chance to visit the fort and imagine they are Roman soldiers, before completing two questions which make up 25% of their overall GCSE grade.

A large number of pupils opt to take History at KS5 at St Anthony’s. We have two classes who are both taught by experienced teachers and we are very proud of our consistently excellent results. In Y12 pupils are given the opportunity to develop knowledge on Nazi Germany more fully. Don’t worry, even if you have never done a History GCSE the course is accessible and designed for no previous knowledge. We also focus on England between the years of 1485 and 1529, focussing on the early Tudor monarchs. In Y13 pupils are given the opportunity to develop their own research and analysis skills through completing a piece of coursework which they are fully responsible for. They study the role of Martin Luther King in the American Civil Rights Movement, and reach conclusions as to his importance in this. Y13 also sees pupils study the rest of the Tudors; Edward VI, Mary I and –arguably the greatest ever British monarch- Elizabeth I. Pupils cannot fail to be enthused by such interesting topics, and we are confident that all students have the best possible experience in all of our lessons. We follow the AQA syllabus, modules 1B, 2M, 3B and 4X.

Year 9

Students begin their History GCSE in Year 9

They follow the module ‘Medicine through time c.1250 to the present day’.

Students will examine;

  • Ideas about the cause of disease and illness
  • Approaches to prevention and treatment
  • Case studies of diseases, individuals and developments in treatments.

Later on in the year they will cover ‘The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries,

treatment and the trenches’.

Skills to be developed

Pupils need to be able to;

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied.
  • Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second order historical concepts (causation, consequence, similarity, difference, change, continuity and significance.)
  • Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.
  • Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied.

 

Assessments

Formal assessments are set three times a year.  Pupils will answer a question under exam conditions.  They will be told in advance which topic to learn, with the exception of key assessment 3 which will cover the whole year’s work.

Exam board is EDEXCEL code 1 H10

There are no extended tasks or controlled assessment.

Resources

Useful websites for pupils are the BBC bitesize KS4, History Learning site, and School History. 

Educational Visits

There are no visits planned in year 9.

No specialist equipment is required.

 

Year 10

Students began their History GCSE in Year 9

  • This year they finish the module ‘Medicine through time c.1250 to the present day’ and by Christmas cover ‘The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches’.
  • From January to April students look at a British Depth study – Anglo Saxon and Norman England c1060 to 1088.
  • From April to July students examine a period study, ‘The American West, c1835–c1895.’

Skills to be developed

Pupils need to be able to;

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied.
  • Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second order historical concepts (causation, consequence, similarity, difference, change, continuity and significance.)
  • Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.
  • Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied.

 

Assessments

Formal assessments are set five times a year.  Pupils will answer a question under exam conditions.  They will be told in advance which topic to learn, with the exception of mock examinations which will cover the whole year’s work.

Exam board is EDEXCEL code 1 H10

There are no extended tasks or controlled assessment.

Resources

Useful websites for pupils are the BBC bitesize KS4, History Learning site, and School History. 

Educational Visits

There are no visits planned in year 10.

No specialist equipment is required.

 

Year 11

  • Students begin the year with their controlled assessment on Segedunum Roman Fort. This unit is worth 25% of the GCSE and takes around 8 weeks to complete.  It is completed under examination conditions and students are given no help when writing this up.
  • From October half term to around Easter, they also follow a depth study – Germany 1918 – 45. This unit makes up 40% of the final mark.  It is examined in the summer of Year 11 through ONE written exam paper, lasting 1hr 45 minutes. There are 64 marks available for this paper including 4 for SPaG.
  • From around Eastertime pupils will revise in lessons for their exam in ‘The History of Medicine’. This is worth 35% of the final total.  They will be examined in the summer of Year 11 through ONE written exam paper, lasting 1hr 45 minutes.  There are 54 marks available for this paper – 4 of them are for SPAG.

Skills to be developed

Pupils need to be able to;

  • Recall, select, organise and use detailed knowledge accurately and effectively showing detailed understanding of historical periods, themes and topics.
  • Communicate ideas using historical terms accurately and give developed explanations. They should justify answers with analysis of key concepts, features and characteristics of the periods studied.
  • Investigate historical questions, problems or issues and reach reasoned and substantiated conclusions, recognising how and why events, people and issues have been interpreted and represented in different ways.

 

Assessments

Internal assessments are set five times a year.  Pupils will answer a question under exam conditions.  They will be told in advance which topic to learn, with the exception of mock examinations which will cover the whole year’s work.  Formal assessment is by 2 examinations at the end of the year.

Exam board is AQA code 9140

Resources

  • SAM Learning and GCSE Bitesize websites
  • G Lacey and K Shephard Germany 1918 – 1945: Students. Book Hodder Murray
  • S Lee Weimar and Nazi Germany (Core Book) Heinemann
  • remember.org (the library of the holocaust)
  • historyplace.com/worldwar2/riseofhitler/index.htm (Hitler’s rise to power)
  • schoolhistory.co.uk

 

Educational Visits

Pupils visit Segedunum Roman Fort in North Tyneside in early October.

No specialist equipment is required.

 

Year 12

Students in year 12 prepare for the A.S. Sociology exam but also for the ‘A’ level.

In year 12 they study three topics.

  1. Education
  • the role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure
  • differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society
  • relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil identities and subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning
  • the significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation, and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of and access to education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy.

 

  1. The Family
  • the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies
  • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and household structures
  • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society
  • the nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
  • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900: birth rates, death rates, family size, life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation.

 

  1. Research Methods

 

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research

 

 

Skills Developed

There are three skills domains for ‘A’ level sociology.

 

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: sociological theories, concepts and evidence

AO2: Apply sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods to a range of issues

AO3: Analyse and evaluate sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods in order to: present arguments, make judgements, draw conclusions.

 

Formal Assessments

 

Formal assessments take place twice per term.  They are based on past and typical questions and increase in difficulty over the course of the year.  Assessments will take place for both parts of the course and students will be told in advance of the format of the assessment as well as the topic areas to learn.  If it is a mock assessment then students will need to learn all of the work they have done.

 

Exam Board and Specification

 

The exam board is AQA 7191 (AS) and 7192 (A level)

 

Resources

 

Students each have a text ‘AQA A level Sociology, by Napier Press.

There is a website to support learning, with online activities www.sociology.uk.net

We also recommend the CGP revision guides for AQA.

The library holds a stock of materials including ‘Sociology Themes and Perspectives’ by Haralambos and Holborn.  This is a more complex text but explanations are excellent and this is useful for more able students. In addition there is a wide range of fiction and non-fiction to support the themes and perspectives covered by this course. 

 

Wider Requirements

 

Sociology is a subject which is constantly changing and students participate in weekly ‘Sociology in the News’ sessions.  We expect students to keep up to date with the news on a daily basis and ask that they watch the Channel 4 News several times a week.  Other news stations can be of value, as are print news although this should not be the tabloid press, and the Independent and Guardian are particularly recommended.  

 

Year 13

Students in year 13 prepare for the full  ‘A’ level examination.

In year 13 they study three topics.

Beliefs in Society

In their study of this topic, students should examine:

  • Ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions the relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations
  • Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice
  • The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices
  • The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, and globalisation and the spread of religions

Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods

The study of the topics in this paper should engage students in theoretical debate while encouraging an active involvement with the research process.

The study should foster a critical awareness of contemporary social processes and change, and draw together the knowledge, understanding and skills learnt in different aspects of the course.

In their study of this topic, students should examine:

  • Topic areas in relation to the two core themes (socialisation, culture and identity; and social differentiation, power and stratification)
  • Both the evidence of and the sociological explanations for the content listed in the topic areas below.

 

Throughout, students should be encouraged to use examples drawn from their own experience of small-scale research.

Attention should be given to drawing out links with other topics studied in this specification.

 

 

Crime and Deviance

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • Crime, deviance, social order and social control
  • The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime
  • Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes
  • Crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies.

 

 

 

 

 

Theory and Methods

Students must examine the following areas:

  • Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research
  • Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories
  • The concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory
  • The nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific
  • The relationship between theory and methods
  • Debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom
  • The relationship between Sociology and social policy.

 

Skills Developed

There are three skills domains for ‘A’ level sociology.

 

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: sociological theories, concepts and evidence

AO2: Apply sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods to a range of issues

AO3: Analyse and evaluate sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods in order to: present arguments, make judgements, draw conclusions.

 

Formal Assessments

Formal assessments take place twice per term.  They are based on past and typical questions and increase in difficulty over the course of the year.  Assessments will take place for both parts of the course and students will be told in advance of the format of the assessment as well as the topic areas to learn.  If it is a mock assessment then students will need to learn all of their work.

 

Exam Board and Specification

 

The exam board is AQA  7192 (A level)

 

Resources

 

Students each have a text ‘AQA A level Sociology, by Napier Press.

There is a website to support learning, with online activities www.sociology.uk.net

We also recommend the CGP revision guides for AQA.

The library holds a stock of materials including ‘Sociology Themes and Perspectives’ by Haralambos and Holborn.  This is a more complex text but explanations are excellent and this is useful for more able students. In addition there is a wide range of fiction and non-fiction to support the themes and perspectives covered by this course. 

 

Wider Requirements

 

Sociology is a subject which is constantly changing and students participate in weekly ‘Sociology in the News’ sessions.  We expect students to keep up to date with the news on a daily basis and ask that they watch the Channel 4 News several times a week.  Other news stations can be of value, as are print news although this should not be the tabloid press, and the Independent and Guardian are particularly recommended.