English

IMPLEMENTATION

Year 7 English

Implementation

KS3 English Intent Language P1 Reading Year 7 HT 1

KS3 English Intent Language P1 Writing Year 7 HT 2

KS3 English Intent Literature P1 Shakespeare Reading Year 7 HT 3

KS3 English Intent Language P2 Writing Year 7 HT 4

KS3 English Intent Language P1 Reading Year 7 HT 5

KS3 English Intent Literature Poetry Year 7 HT 6

The areas studied in English in Year 7 include:

  • 19th Century Novel – ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • Creative Writing – Descriptive and Narrative
  • Shakespeare – ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’
  • The Modern novel
  • Poetry – ‘Change’

The skills developed in English in Year 7 include:

Reading to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to inform, explain and describe and to present a viewpoint or argument.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, including presentations, discussions and role place activities.  Students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English in all Spoken Language work.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • A creative writing piece – Descriptive
  • A reading response to an unseen fiction piece
  • A creative writing piece linked to image stimulus

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literature reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens
  • ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ by William Shakespeare
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 3 English Language and English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Spelling Bee competition
  • Reading groups and activities
  • Year 7 drama activities and events

Year 8 English

Implementation

KS3 English Intent Language P2 Reading Year 8 HT 1

KS3 English Intent Language P2 Writing Year 8 HT 2

KS3 English Intent Literature P1 Shakespeare Reading Year 8 HT 3

KS3 English Intent Language P1 Reading Year 8 HT 4

KS3 English Intent Language P1 Writing Year 8 HT 5

KS3 English Intent Literature Poetry Year 8 HT 6

The areas studied in English in Year 8 include:

  • Viewpoint Reading – ‘Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl’ and Viewpoint extracts
  • Viewpoint Writing
  • Shakespeare – ‘Macbeth’
  • Literature Through Time
  • Creative Writing – Descriptive and Narrative
  • Poetry – ‘Relationships’

The skills developed in English in Year 8 include:

Reading to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to inform, explain and describe and to present a viewpoint or argument.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, including presentations, discussions and role place activities.  Students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English in all Spoken Language work.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A viewpoint reading response to ‘Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl’
  • A viewpoint writing piece
  • A reading response to an unseen fiction piece
  • A creative writing piece linked to image stimulus

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literature reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl’
  • ‘Macbeth’ by William Shakespeare
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 3 English Language and English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Reading groups and activities
  • Year 8 drama activities and events 

Year 9 English

Implementation

Y9 Intent Term 1.1 Lit P1 R&J

Y9 Intent Term 1.2 Lang P2 Writing

Y9 Intent Term 2.1 Lit P2 AIC

Y9 Intent Term 2.2 Lang P1 Reading

Y9 Intent Term 3.1 Lang P1 Writing

Y9 Intent Term 3.2 Lit P2 Poetry

The areas studied in English in Year 9 include:

  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction writing
  • 20th century play – ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • Literary fiction reading
  • Literary fiction creative writing
  • Poetry – selection of ‘Power and Conflict’ poems and unseen poetry

The skills developed in English in Year 9 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • A non-fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • Reading responses to literary fiction questions
  • A literary fiction creative writing piece
  • A reading response to selected poetry

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Selection of unseen poetry
  • AQA resources – GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature
  • GCSE Pod resources
  • KS4 audio lesson on Frog VLE

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities

Year 10 English

Implementation

Y10 Intent Term 1.1 Lit P1 J&H

Y10 Intent Term 1.2 Lang P2 Reading

Y10 Intent Term 2.1 Lit P2 Poetry

Y10 Intent Term 2.2 Lang P1 Reading

Y10 Intent Term 3.1 Lit P2 AIC

Y10 Intent Term 3.2 Lang P1&2 Writing

The areas studied in English in Year 10 include:

  • 19th century novel – ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’
  • Literary non-fiction reading
  • Literary fiction creative writing and non-fiction viewpoint writing
  • 20th century play – ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary fiction reading
  • Poetry – selected ‘Power and Conflict’ poems and unseen poetry
  • Spoken Language Study

The skills developed in English in Year 10 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • Literary non-fiction reading questions
  • Literary fiction writing piece and non-fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • A reading response to poetry – anthology and unseen
  • Spoken Language project preparation

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Selection of unseen poetry
  • AQA resources: GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature
  • GCSE Pod resources
  • KS4 audio lesson on Frog VLE

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities

Year 11 English

Implementation

Y11 Intent Term 1.1 Lit P1 J&H

Y11 Intent Term 1.1 Lit P2 Poetry

Y11 Intent Term 1.2 Lit P1 R&J

Y11 Intent Term 2.1 Lang P2

Y11 Intent Term 2.1 Lit P2

Y11 Intent Term 2.2 Lang P1

Y11 Intent Term 2.2 Lit P1

The areas studied in English in Year 11 include:

  • Literary fiction reading and creative writing
  • Literary non-fiction reading and viewpoint writing
  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • 19th century novel – ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by R L Stevenson
  • Modern Drama – ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • Anthology poetry – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Unseen poetry

The skills developed in English in Year 11 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.  Students will prepare a project on a topical issue and present their ideas in a formal setting; this work will be assessed for the Spoken Language endorsement.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • Literary fiction reading questions
  • Literary fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction reading questions
  • Literary non-fiction writing pieces
  • A reading response to poetry – anthology and unseen
  • Spoken Language project presentation

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  •  ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  •  ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Selected unseen poetry
  • AQA resources: GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature
  • GCSE Pod resources
  • KS4 audio lessons on Frog VLE

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities
  • GCSE revision sessions

ENGLISH – KEY STAGE 5

There are three A Level qualifications offered in the English Department: English Language, English Literature and Media Studies.  All subjects are studied in Year 12 and Year 13.

Year 12 and 13 English Language

Implementation

English Lang Y12 Term 1

English Lang Y12 Term 2

English Lang Y12 Term 3

English Lang Y13 Term 1

English Lang Y13 Term 2

English Lang Y13 Term 3

The areas studied include:                      

Language Levels

Students learn the following levels of language which will underpin their learning throughout the course:

  • Phonetics, phonology and prosodics: how speech sounds and effects are articulated Graphology: the visual aspects of textual design and appearance
  • Lexis and semantics: the vocabulary of English, including social and historical variation
  • Grammar, including morphology: the structural patterns and shapes of English at sentence, clause, phrase and word level
  • Pragmatics: the contextual aspects of language use
  • Discourse: extended stretches of communication occurring in different genres, modes and contexts.

A study of a variety of texts, applying the Language Levels to them:

  • Texts using different sociolects (to include social and occupational groups, and gender)
  • Texts using different dialects (to include regional and national varieties of English within the British Isles)
  • Texts that use language to represent the different groups above
  • Written, spoken and electronic texts about a range of subjects, for various audiences and purposes in a variety of genres
  • Items from collections of language data (e.g. dictionaries, online resources, language corpora)
  • Research findings (e.g. tables, graphs, statistics).

The skills developed include:

  • To be able develop and apply their understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language
  • Explore data and examples of language in use
  • Engage creatively and critically with a varied programme for the study of English
  • Interpretation and production of language

Subject content

Assessments:

Paper 1: Language, the individual and society

What’s assessed

  • Textual variations and representations
  • Children’s language development (0-11 years)
  • Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Assessed:

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 100 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change

What’s assessed

  • Language diversity and change
  • Language discourses
  • Writing skills
  • Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Assessed:

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 100 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Exam board:

  • AQA exam board

Resources to support learning:

  • Cambridge English Language A/AS Level for AQA book
  • Cambridge Elevate online resource
  • Universal teacher resources
  • BBC Voices resources

NEA:

Two different kinds of individual research:

  • A language investigation (2,000 words excluding data)
  • A piece of original writing and commentary (750 words each

The skills developed include:

Revisiting language levels and applying them to all areas of study:

  • Understanding how language varies because of personal, social, geographical and temporal contexts
  • Why language varies and changes, developing critical knowledge and understanding of different

Views and explanations:

  • Attitudes to language variation and change
  • The use of language according to audience, purpose, genre and mode
  • How language is used to enact relationships

Writing skills will include:

  • Writing discursively about language issues in an academic essay
  • Writing analytically about texts as parts of discourses about language
  • Writing about language issues in a variety of forms to communicate their ideas to a non-specialist audience

Year 12 and 13 English Literature

Implementation

English Literature Y12 Term 1

English Literature Y12Term 2

English Literature Y12 Term 3

English Literature Y13 Term 1

English Literature Y13 Term 2

English Literature Y13 Term 3

The areas studied include:

  • Love through the ages: Shakespeare, Prose and Poetry – study of a Shakespeare play, a novel and an anthology of poetry written pre1900
  • Wider study of the Literature of Love in preparation for unseen poetry in the exam

The skills developed include:

  • Ability to engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them
  • Ability to develop and effectively apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation
  • Ability to explore the contexts of texts and others’ interpretations of them.
  • Ability to articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression.
  • Ability to explore connections across literary texts.
  • Ability to read independently

Formal assessments will include:

  • Essays and practice questions
  • At least one ‘mock’ exam

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider reading in Literature of Love
  • Personal reading and research during summer between Year 12 and 13, in preparation for NEA.

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA English Literature, Specification A

Resources to support learning:

  • The department and academy LRC have a wide collection of texts covering elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.
  • In the course of the year reading suggestions and lists will be given as appropriate.

Wider reading suggestions:

  • Prose
  • Jane Austen Persuasion
  • Emily Brontë Wuthering Heights
  • Kate Chopin The Awakening
  • Jonathan Coe The Rotters’ Club
  • George Eliot The Mill on the Floss
  • Thomas Hardy Tess of the D’Urbervilles
  • Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
  • E.M. Forster A Room with a View
  • L.P. Hartley The Go-Between
  • Ian McEwan Atonement

Poetry

  • The Faber book of Love poetry

Drama

  • Any background to Shakespeare or Shakespearean Tragedy

Additional events, visits and activities include:

Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours), visits to places associated with particular authors, other lectures or exhibitions, relevant online short courses (MOOCs)  will be arranged or suggested as they occur.

The areas studied include:

Texts in Shared contexts

  • Option: Literature of WW1 and its aftermath.
  • Study of three set texts: one poetry, one drama and one prose text, of which one must be written post 2000.
  • Study of wider literature and contexts of WW1 in preparation for an unseen prose extract in the exam.

NEA: Independent critical study -Texts Across Time

  • Comparative critical study of two texts, at least one of which must have been written pre-1900.

The skills developed include:

  • Ability to engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them
  • Ability to develop and effectively apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation
  • Ability to explore the contexts of texts and others’ interpretations of them.
  • Ability to articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression.
  • Ability to explore connections across literary texts.
  • Ability to read independently
  • Ability to work independently on a piece of academic study of literature

Formal assessments will include:

  • Essays and practice questions
  • At least one ‘mock’ exam
  • Two final exams in summer of year 13 each worth 40% of the A level
  • NEA (Independent study) worth 20% of the A level

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider reading in each area of literary study (Literature of Love, Literature of WW1)
  • Personal reading and research during summer between Year 12 and 13, in preparation for NEA.

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA English Literature, Specification A.

Coursework in Year 13:

  • NEA – independent study

Resources to support learning:

The department and academy LRC have a wide collection of texts covering elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.

In the course of the year reading suggestions and lists will be given as appropriate. Particularly for the NEA it is an exam requirement that students find personal critical resources.

Wider Reading to support Learning:

Literature of WW1 and its aftermath

Prose

  • Rebecca West The Return of the Soldier
  • Erich Maria Remarque (translated by Brian Murdoch)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (Vintage paperback edition)*
  • Susan Hill Strange Meeting
  • Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms
  • Robert Graves Goodbye to All That
  • Sebastian Barry A Long, Long Way (post-2000)
  • Ben Elton The First Casualty (post-2000)
  • Pat Barker Life Class (post-2000)

Drama

  • Peter Whelan The Accrington Pals
  • Richard Curtis and Ben Elton Blackadder Goes Forth
  • Joan Littlewood Oh! What a Lovely War
  • R.C. Sherriff Journey’s End

Poetry

  • George Walter The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
  • Jon Stallworthy The Oxford Book of War Poetry
  • Jon Stallworthy The War Poems of Wilfred Owen

Additional events, visits and activities include:

Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours), visits to places associated with particular authors, other lectures or exhibitions, relevant online short courses (MOOCs)  will be arranged or suggested as they occur.

Year 12 and 13 Media Studies

Media Y12 Term 1

Media Y12 Term 2

Media Y12 Term 3

Media Y13 Term 1

Media Y13 Term 2

Media Y13 Term 3

A Level Media Studies is a two year course where students will develop their knowledge of how media has developed through time and how it continues to develop at a rapid pace. They will also develop analytical skills, exploring how to ‘read’ and decode a piece of media.

As a contemporary subject, Media Studies offers students excellent opportunities to develop and shape their own perception of the media that surrounds them, and invites them to come up with original and supported judgements and conclusions about the products we consume every day. Additionally, students will also gain creative skills in creating their own media within the coursework component of the qualification.

Underpinning the entire course is an extensive ‘theoretical framework’ where, over the course of two years, students study 19 academic theorists/theories and learn how to apply these to a range of media texts. There are also 18 set media texts to study called ‘Close Study Products’ (CSPs). These fall under the nine media areas of: TV, film, magazine, newspaper, radio, advertising, video games, music video and online, social and participatory media. Students receive a booklet of these at the beginning of their studies, and these are updated on a yearly basis by the exam board to include relevant and up-to-date media products.

Examples of some set products are: studying the original 1938 ‘War of the Worlds’ radio broadcast in conjunction with BBC Radio One’s ‘Newsbeat’ programme; studying TV crime drama through an episode of British TV series ‘The Missing’ in conjunction with an episode of French TV series ‘Witnesses’; studying a recent YouTube advertisement for Maybelline mascara in conjunction with a print advertisement for men’s hair cream from the 1960s.

In applying the theoretical framework to media products, students will produce insightful, extended essay responses to these, as well as take part in exciting debates about the past, present and future of media products.

In the first year of the course students will study the underpinning theory of Media Studies, alongside beginning to study the CSPs. They will also be taught necessary academic skills to form insightful written essays. At the end of this year, students will be given their coursework booklet and be asked to choose a brief and begin research in order to create their own media.

In the second year of the course, students will study the remaining CSPs, complete their coursework and revise for formal examinations in the summer.

Implementation

Resources to support students:

  • An extensive media library of all set theorists, plus texts covering wider reading and creative skills. These are available within the media department, and additional copies are available for students to take out from the main school library;
  • A suite of computers for students to complete research tasks and coursework;
  • Various equipment to support students with coursework creation e.g. microphones, lighting, cameras etc.
  • A subscription to the English and Media Centre’s ‘MediaMag’ with digital and print access to monthly copies for all students.

Course Outline

Exam Board: AQA

70% Exam: 2x 2 hour Paper (84 marks each)

30% Coursework (60 marks)

Paper 1 – Unseen sources and CSPs

Paper 2 – 1 unseen short question and 3 long form essay question on theoretical framework and CSPs

Coursework – Choose one media ‘brief’ to fulfil from an optional six published yearly by AQA. Each brief asks students to create two linked media products e.g. an online advertising campaign and three pages of a print magazine based on a social activism area of their choice, or a short YouTube trailer and three billboard posters to advertise and market a ‘coming of age’ film.

Four areas of theoretical framework:

  • Media language
  • Media representation
  • Media industries
  • Media audiences

Contexts of the media:

  • Social
  • Cultural
  • Political
  • Economic
  • Historical

Media Forms:

  • Television
  • Film – (N.B. films may only be studied in the context of media industries)
  • Radio
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Advertising and marketing
  • Online, social and participatory media
  • Video games
  • Music videos

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The theoretical framework of media
  • Contexts of media and their influence on media products and processes

AO2: Apply knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework of media to:

  • Analyse media products, including in relation to their contexts and through the use of academic theories
  • Make judgements and draw conclusions

AO3: Create media products for an intended audience, by applying knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework of media to communicate meaning.

Media Studies Theoretical Framework

MEDIA LANGUAGE

  1. Roland Barthes: Semiotics
  2. Tzvetan Todorov: Narratology
  3. Steve Neale: Genre
  4. Claude Lévi-Strauss: Structuralism/binary oppositions
  5. Jean Baudrillard: Hyperreality, simulacra and simulation

Suggested wider reading for Media Language:

  1. Propp: Narratology (character types)
  2. Saussure: Signs and signifiers
  3. Thomas Schatz: Genres of order and integration
  4. Jason Mittell: Genre as cultural category
  5. Dudley Andrew: Genre as blueprint

MEDIA REPRESENTATION

  1. Stuart Hall: encoding and decoding/’New Ethnicities’
  2. David Gauntlett: Fluidity of identity
  3. Liesbet Van Zoonen: Gender as discourse
  4. Judith Butler: Gender as performativity
  5. bell hooks: Intersectionality
  6. Paul Gilroy: Post-colonial identity

Suggested wider reading for Media Representations:

  1. Laura Mulvey: The male gaze
  2. Ariel Levy: Raunch culture
  3. Manuel Alverado: Racial stereotypes
  4. Edward Said: Orientalism
  5. Paul Hunt: Representations of disability
  6. Alison Bechdel: The Bechdel test

MEDIA INDUSTRIES

  1. James Curran and Jean Seaton: Power without responsibility
  2. Sonia Livingstone and Peter Lunt: Issues of media regulation
  3. David Hesmondhalgh: Cultural industries

Suggested wider reading for Media Industries:

  1. Galtung and Ruge: News Values

MEDIA AUDIENCES

  1. Albert Bandura: Social learning/media effects
  2. George Gerbner: Cultivation theory
  3. Stuart Hall: Reception theory
  4. Henry Jenkins: Fandom
  5. Clay Shirky: End of audience

Suggested wider reading for Media Audiences:

  1. Blumler and Katz: Uses and gratifications
  2. Harold Lasswell: Hypodermic needle theory
  3. Paul Lazarsfeld: Two step flow theory
  4. Abraham Maslow: Hierarchy of needs
  5. Skinner: Operant conditioning
  6. Young and Rubicam: 4 Cs
  7. Miguel Sabido: Positive cultivation
  8. Stanley Cohen: Moral panics
  9. Richard Dyer: Utopian Solutions