English

The English Department at St. Anthony’s is a vibrant department with a wealth of experience and expertise, and we are dedicated to ensuring that all students have an enjoyable and enriching time in English lessons.

We have a passion for reading and we encourage all students to share our love of books. Students in all year groups will read a range of literature and non-fiction texts in English, and we will encourage students to develop their reading and interpretation skills. As well as interpreting writers’ ideas, students are encouraged to develop their own ideas and share these with others. We value students’ opinions, particularly about literature, and endeavour to help students develop independence in their thinking and writing.

All students will learn how to write for a range of different audiences and purposes, and we hope this will equip them with the skills needed to communicate effectively in their future careers. We encourage students to develop imaginative ideas in their creative writing and many pieces of writing have been entered for local and national competitions.

As well as developing reading and writing skills, students will also have many opportunities to use spoken language in a range of different situations. Students will study dramatic techniques, presentation skills and will be encouraged to take part in many discussions and debates.

Throughout all of their work in English, students will be encouraged to develop as individuals who have confidence in all of their reading, writing and spoken language skills.

Our vision is to ensure that every learner is treated with equality, dignity and respect, and is encouraged to achieve their very best.

English – Key Stage 3

Year 7 English

The areas studied in English in Year 7 include:

  • 19th century novel – ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • Creative writing
  • Poetry – ‘Change’
  • Shakespeare – ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’
  • Non-fiction writing
  • Modern novel

The skills developed in English in Year 7 include:

Reading to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to inform, explain and describe and to present a viewpoint or argument.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, including presentations, discussions and role place activities.  Students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English in all Spoken Language work.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘A Christmas Carol’
  • A creative writing piece
  • A reading response to poetry
  • A reading response to ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’
  • A non-fiction writing piece

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literature reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens
  • ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ by William Shakespeare
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 3 English Language and English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Spelling Bee competition
  • Reading groups and activities
  • Year 7 drama activities and events

 

Year 8 English

The areas studied in English in Year 8 include:

  • 19th century novel – ‘Jane Eyre’
  • Creative writing
  • Poetry – ‘Love’
  • Shakespeare – ‘Much Ado About Nothing’
  • Non-fiction writing
  • Modern novel

The skills developed in English in Year 8 include:

Reading to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to inform, explain and describe and to present a viewpoint or argument.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, including presentations, discussions and role place activities.  Students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English in all Spoken Language work.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Jane Eyre’
  • A creative writing piece
  • A reading response to poetry
  • A reading response to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’
  • A non-fiction writing piece

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literature reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Jane Eyre’ by Charlotte Bronte
  • ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ by William Shakespeare
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 3 English Language and English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Reading groups and activities
  • Year 8 drama activities and events 

English – Key Stage 4

Students in Years 9, 10 and 11 will study GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature with the AQA exam board.

 

Year 9 English 2016-2017

The areas studied in English in Year 9 include:

  • 19th century novel – ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’
  • Literary fiction writing
  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction writing
  • Literary fiction reading
  • Anthology poetry – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster

The skills developed in English in Year 9 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • A descriptive writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • A non-fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘Power and Conflict’ poetry

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include: 

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities 

 

Year 10 English 2016-2017

The areas studied in English in Year 10 include:

  • 19th century novel – ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’
  • Literary fiction reading and writing
  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction reading and writing
  • Anthology poetry – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Unseen poetry

The skills developed in English in Year 10 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • Literary fiction reading questions
  • Literary fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction reading questions
  • Literary non-fiction writing pieces
  • A reading response to poetry – anthology and unseen
  • Spoken Language project preparation

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature
  • AQA resources: GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities

 

Year 11 English 2016-2017

The areas studied in English in Year 11 include:

  • Literary fiction reading and writing
  • 19th century novel – ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’
  • Shakespeare – ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction reading and writing
  • Modern Drama – ‘An Inspector Calls’
  • Anthology poetry – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • Unseen poetry

The skills developed in English in Year 11 include:

Reading to understand and respond to texts, to develop a personal response, to select and retrieve information, to develop understanding of plot and character, to understand language and its effects, to understand structural devices, to understand how to infer and deduce, to understand the contexts of writing and to understand writer’s ideas and perspectives.

Writing for specific purposes and audiences including to describe, to narrate, to present a viewpoint and to present personal responses.  Writing using appropriate communication and organisation, including appropriate spelling, punctuation, sentence structures, paragraphs, grammatical features and vocabulary.

Spoken Language skills will be used to communicate effectively in a range of formal and informal situations, and students will use appropriate vocabulary and Standard English.  Students will prepare a project on a topical issue and present their ideas in a formal setting; this work will be assessed for the Spoken Language endorsement.

Formal assessments will include:

  • A reading response to ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
  • Literary fiction reading questions
  • Literary fiction writing piece
  • A reading response to ‘Romeo and Juliet’
  • Literary non-fiction reading questions
  • Literary non-fiction writing pieces
  • A reading response to poetry – anthology and unseen
  • Spoken Language project presentation

Exam board and specifications:

  • AQA exam board
  • GCSE English Language 8700
  • GCSE English Literature 8702

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider literary reading at home and during tutorial time
  • Developing non-fiction reading through newspapers, online articles and blogs
  • Developing extended writing across all subject areas

Resources to support learning:

  • ‘Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J B Priestley
  • AQA Past and present: poetry anthology – ‘Power and Conflict’ cluster
  • BBC Bitesize – Key Stage 4 English Language and English Literature
  • AQA resources: GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • GCSE intervention and support groups
  • GCSE reading groups and activities

English – Key Stage 5

There are four A Level qualifications offered in the English Department: Drama and Theatre Studies, English Language, English Literature and Media Studies.  All subjects are offered in Year 12 and Year 13.

 

Year 12 Drama and Theatre

The areas studied in Drama and Theatre in Year 12 include:

  • The development of European theatre
  • The work of significant theatre practitioners.
  • Creating Performance from Text.
  • Theatrecraft including Lighting, Sound, Set and Costume Design, Direction and Acting skills.
  • Study of AS exam set text– The Servant of Two Masters by Carlo Goldoni.
  • The influence of Commedia dell’Arte.
  • Comedy as a theatrical genre.
  • Significant Practitioner Study: Konstantin Stanislavski.
  • Practical performance workshops of selected key scenes from The Crucible by Arthur Miller and Be My Baby by Amanda Whittington for the Practical Theatre exam.

The skills developed include:

  • Analytical, critical and evaluative skills through debate and discussion.
  • Listening skills and the use of non-verbal communication.
  • Creative, interpersonal, problem-solving, and collaborative skills
  • Knowledge and understanding from research and working independently.

Formal assessments will include:

  • Practical work assessed through an externally marked exploration and interpretation of two key extracts from different plays leading to the formal presentation of one extract to an audience and the preparation of a Portfolio of evidence:  60% of the overall mark.
  • 2 hour exam paper, responding to questions on one set play and live theatre performances seen: 40% of the overall mark.
  • Other formal assessments take the form of exam style questions in timed conditions as well as practical assessments based on the syllabus mark scheme.
  • Weekly informal assessments using targeted homework tasks and a Learning Journal.
  • The exam syllabus assessment criteria is used throughout the course.

Extended tasks include:

  • Preparation for the Performance exam. 

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA AS Drama and Theatre Syllabus (7216) leading to the full A level qualification in Year 13 (7262) NB This is the first year of this specification.

Coursework in Year 12:

  • Coursework portfolio during their preparation for the Performance exam.

Resources to support learning:

Students will be directed to other specific websites as part of their studies, but the following links are useful for background research:

http://theatredatabase.com

http://www.backstage.ac.uk

http://www.fashionmuseum.co.uk

http://www.rsc.org.uk

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk

https://www.youtube.com/user/ntdiscovertheatre

 

Useful reading

The department has a wide collection of playscripts and books covering all practical and theoretical elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.  However, the following books may be of general interest as reference works:

Drama & Theatre Studies at AS & A Level by Jonothan Neelands and Warwick Dobson (Hodder & Stoughton Ltd 2000)

Theatrecraft by John Caird (Faber and Faber, 2010)

The Year of the King: An Actor’s Diary by Antony Sher (Methuen 1986)

 

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours) to analyse elements of stagecraft and performance they have seen.  This work forms an essential element of their written exam paper in May.
  • Students may be expected to rehearse outside of taught hours: attendance at a half day rehearsal of the final Practical Assessment during the Easter holidays is also to be expected.

 

Year 13 Drama and Theatre Studies

The areas studied in Drama and Theatre Studies in Year 13 include:

  • Study of A2 exam set text– The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht.
  • Brecht’s theories and working practices: ‘Epic Theatre’.
  • Interpretation of the play as a director.
  • Study of A2 exam set text– The Servant of Two Masters by Carlo Goldoni.
  • The influence of Commedia dell’Arte.
  • Comedy as a theatrical genre.
  • Interpretation of the play as a director, performer or designer.
  • Research into a significant theatre genre or form (eg Feminist Theatre, Documentary Theatre, Adaptation, Verbatim Theatre) to be chosen by the group.
  • Creation of a substantial original devised piece in the same style: open choice of subject matter and format to be chosen by the group.

The skills developed include:

  • Analytical, critical and evaluative skills through debate and discussion.
  • Listening skills and the use of non-verbal communication.
  • Creative, interpersonal, problem-solving, and collaborative skills
  • Knowledge and understanding from research and working independently.

Formal assessments will include:

  • Practical work assessed through an externally moderated devised piece and the preparation of Supporting Notes:  40% of the overall mark.
  • 2 hour exam paper, responding to questions on two set plays. 60% of the overall mark.
  • Other formal assessments take the form of exam style questions in timed conditions as well as practical assessments based on the syllabus mark scheme.
  • Weekly informal assessments are also made using targeted homework tasks and a Learning Journal.
  • The exam syllabus assessment criteria is used throughout the course.

Extended tasks include:

  • Preparation for the Performance exam (40 hour project)

Exam board and specification:

Students study the AQA A2 Drama and Theatre Studies Syllabus (2241) which, with their AS qualification, will lead to full A level accreditation. (NB: This is the final year of this specification and this information relates only to students taking the A2 exam in 2017)

Coursework in Year 13:

Independent research and preparation of Supporting Notes during their preparation for the Performance exam.

Resources to support learning:

Students will be directed to other specific websites as part of their studies, but the following links are useful for background research:

www.franticassembly.co.uk

http://theatredatabase.com

http://www.backstage.ac.uk

http://www.fashionmuseum.co.uk

http://www.rsc.org.uk

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk

https://www.youtube.com/user/ntdiscovertheatre

 

Useful reading

The department has a wide collection of playscripts and books covering all practical and theoretical elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.  However, the following books may be of general interest as reference works:

  • Drama & Theatre Studies at AS & A Level by Jonothan Neelands and Warwick Dobson (Hodder & Stoughton Ltd 2000)
  • Theatrecraft by John Caird (Faber and Faber, 2010)
  • The Year of the King: An Actor’s Diary by Antony Sher (Methuen 1986)

Additional events, visits and activities include:

  • Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours) to analyse elements of their chosen theatrical genre or form.  This work forms an essential element of their Supporting Notes.
  • Students may be expected to rehearse outside of taught hours: attendance at a full day rehearsal of the final Practical Assessment during the Easter holidays is also to be expected.

 

Year 12 English Language

The areas studied in AS English Language in Year 12 include:

Language levels

Students learn the following levels of language which will underpin their learning throughout the course:

  • Phonetics, phonology and prosodics: how speech sounds and effects are articulated Graphology: the visual aspects of textual design and appearance
  • Lexis and semantics: the vocabulary of English, including social and historical variation
  • Grammar, including morphology: the structural patterns and shapes of English at sentence, clause, phrase and word level
  • Pragmatics: the contextual aspects of language use
  • Discourse: extended stretches of communication occurring in different genres, modes and contexts.

A study of a variety of texts, applying the Language Levels to them:

  • Texts using different sociolects (to include social and occupational groups, and gender)
  • Texts using different dialects (to include regional and national varieties of English within the British Isles)
  • Texts that use language to represent the different groups above
  • Written, spoken and electronic texts about a range of subjects, for various audiences and purposes in a variety of genres
  • Items from collections of language data (eg dictionaries, online resources, language corpora)
  • Research findings (eg tables, graphs, statistics).

The skills developed include:

  • To be able develop and apply their understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language
  • Explore data and examples of language in use
  • Engage creatively and critically with a varied programme for the study of English
  • Interpretation and production of language

Formal assessments will include:

AS Paper 1

  • Language and the Individual
  • Questions 1 and 2
    • Analyse how Text A uses language to create meanings and representations
    • Analyse how Text B uses language to create meanings and representations
  • Question 3
    • Compare and contrast Text A and Text B, showing ways in which they are similar and different in their language use

AS Paper 2

  • Language Varieties
  • Candidates are given a choice of questions, to assess knowledge about the use of language, language theorists and writing for purpose and audience

Extended tasks include:

  • Termly key assessments as well as additional written responses
  • Collection of own data
  • Mini Investigations

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA exam board
  • AS English Language 7701

Resources to support learning:

  • Cambridge English Language A/AS Level for AQA book
  • Cambridge Elevate online resource
  • Universal teacher resources
  • BBC Voices resources

 

Year 13 English Language

The areas studied in A2 English Language in Year 13 include:

Language, the individual and society:

  • Methods of language analysis to explore concepts of audience, purpose, genre, mode and representation.
  • Study of children’s language development, exploring how children learn language and how they are able to understand and express themselves through language.

Language diversity and change:

  • Students will study the key concepts of audience, purpose, genre and mode and will explore language in its wider social, geographical and temporal contexts.
  • They will explore processes of language Change as well as attitudes to change.

Coursework in Year 13:

Two different kinds of individual research:

  • A language investigation (2,000 words excluding data)
  • A piece of original writing and commentary (750 words each

The skills developed include:

Revisiting language levels and applying them to all areas of study:

  • Understanding how language varies because of personal, social, geographical and temporal contexts
  • Why language varies and changes, developing critical knowledge and understanding of different

Views and explanations:

  • Attitudes to language variation and change
  • The use of language according to audience, purpose, genre and mode
  • How language is used to enact relationships

Writing skills will include:

  • Writing discursively about language issues in an academic essay
  • Writing analytically about texts as parts of discourses about language
  • Writing about language issues in a variety of forms to communicate their ideas to a non-specialist audience

Formal assessments will include:

Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society – 2 hours 30 minutes

  • Textual variations and Representations
  • Children’s Language Development

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change – 2 hours 30 minutes

  • Choice of two questions on language diversity and change

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA exam board
  • A2 English Language 7702

Resources to support learning:

  • Cambridge English Language A/AS Level for AQA book
  • Cambridge Elevate online resource
  • Universal teacher resources
  • BBC Voices resources
  • Listen to your child – David Crystal

 

Year 12 English Literature

The areas studied in Year 12 include:

  • Love through the ages: Shakespeare and Poetry – study of a Shakespeare play and an anthology of poetry written pre1900
  • Love through the ages: Prose – study of two set novels one pre1900
  • Wider study of the Literature of Love in preparation for unseen prose in the exam

The skills developed include:

  • Ability to engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them
  • Ability to develop and effectively apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation
  • Ability to explore the contexts of texts and others’ interpretations of them.
  • Ability to articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression.
  • Ability to explore connections across literary texts.
  • Ability to read independently

Formal assessments will include:

  • Essays and practice questions
  • At least one ‘mock’ exam
  • Two final exams in summer of year 13 each worth 50% of the AS level

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider reading in Literature of Love
  • Personal reading and research during summer between Year 12 and 13, in preparation for NEA.

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA English Literature, Specification A (AS level)

Coursework in Year 12:

  • There is no coursework in year 12

Resources to support learning:

  • The department and academy LRC have a wide collection of texts covering elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.
  • In the course of the year reading suggestions and lists will be given as appropriate.

Wider reading suggestions:

  • Prose
  • Jane Austen Persuasion
  • Emily Brontë Wuthering Heights
  • Kate Chopin The Awakening
  • Jonathan Coe The Rotters’ Club
  • George Eliot The Mill on the Floss
  • Thomas Hardy Tess of the D’Urbervilles
  • Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
  • E.M. Forster A Room with a View
  • L.P. Hartley The Go-Between
  • Ian McEwan Atonement

Poetry

  • The Faber book of Love poetry

Drama

  • Any background to Shakespeare or Shakespearean Tragedy

Additional events, visits and activities include:

Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours), visits to places associated with particular authors, other lectures or exhibitions, relevant online short courses (MOOCs)  will be arranged or suggested as they occur.

 

Year 13 English Literature 

The areas studied in Year 13 include:

Texts in Shared contexts

  • Option 2A: Literature of WW1 and its aftermath.
  • Study of three set texts: one poetry, one drama and one prose text, of which one must be written post 2000.
  • Study of wider literature and contexts of WW1 in preparation for an unseen prose extract in the exam.

NEA: Independent critical study -Texts Across Time

  • Comparative critical study of two texts, at least one of which must have been written pre-1900.

Love through the Ages: Shakespeare and Poetry (This includes revisiting material studied at AS to be examined in a different format.)

  • Study of three set texts: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900, and one Shakespeare play.
  • Wider study of the Literature of Love in preparation for unseen poetry in the exam

The skills developed include:

  • Ability to engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them
  • Ability to develop and effectively apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation
  • Ability to explore the contexts of texts and others’ interpretations of them.
  • Ability to articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression.
  • Ability to explore connections across literary texts.
  • Ability to read independently
  • Ability to work independently on a piece of academic study of literature

Formal assessments will include:

  • Essays and practice questions
  • At least one ‘mock’ exam
  • Two final exams in summer of year 13 each worth 40% of the A level
  • NEA (Independent study) worth 20% of the A level

Extended tasks include:

  • Wider reading in each area of literary study (Literature of Love, Literature of WW1)
  • Personal reading and research during summer between Year 12 and 13, in preparation for NEA.

Exam board and specification:

  • AQA English Literature, Specification A.

Coursework in Year 13:

  • NEA – independent study

Resources to support learning:

The department and academy LRC have a wide collection of texts covering elements of the course and students are encouraged to borrow these for extended reading.

In the course of the year reading suggestions and lists will be given as appropriate. Particularly for the NEA it is an exam requirement that students find personal critical resources.

Wider Reading

  • Literature of Love

Prose

  • Jane Austen Persuasion
  • Emily Brontë Wuthering Heights
  • Kate Chopin The Awakening
  • Jonathan Coe The Rotters’ Club
  • George Eliot The Mill on the Floss
  • Thomas Hardy Tess of the D’Urbervilles
  • Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
  • E.M. Forster A Room with a View
  • L.P. Hartley The Go-Between
  • Ian McEwan Atonement

Poetry

  • The Faber book of Love poetry

Drama

  • Any background to Shakespeare or Shakespearean Tragedy

Literature of WW1 and its aftermath

Prose

  • Rebecca West The Return of the Soldier
  • Erich Maria Remarque (translated by Brian Murdoch)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (Vintage paperback edition)*
  • Susan Hill Strange Meeting
  • Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms
  • Robert Graves Goodbye to All That
  • Sebastian Barry A Long, Long Way (post-2000)
  • Ben Elton The First Casualty (post-2000)
  • Pat Barker Life Class (post-2000)

Drama

  • Peter Whelan The Accrington Pals
  • Richard Curtis and Ben Elton Blackadder Goes Forth
  • Joan Littlewood Oh! What a Lovely War
  • R.C. Sherriff Journey’s End

Poetry

  • George Walter The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
  • Jon Stallworthy The Oxford Book of War Poetry
  • Jon Stallworthy The War Poems of Wilfred Owen

Additional events, visits and activities include:

Opportunities to attend theatre performances (out of school hours), visits to places associated with particular authors, other lectures or exhibitions, relevant online short courses (MOOCs)  will be arranged or suggested as they occur.